Last edited by Vudozahn
Wednesday, August 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century found in the catalog.

Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century

Stefan Koppelkamm

Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century

by Stefan Koppelkamm

  • 62 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Granada in London, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Architecture, Modern -- 19th century.,
  • Conservatories.,
  • Greenhouses.,
  • Orangeries.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 111-[112].

    StatementStefan Koppelkamm ; translated by Kathrine Talbot.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination111, [1] p. :
    Number of Pages111
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16566397M
    ISBN 100246116307

    Kohlmaier, Georg and Sartory, Barnavon Houses of glass: a nineteenth-century building type. MIT, Koppelkamm, Stefan Glasshouses and winter gardens of the nineteenth century. Granada, I98I. Lemmon, Kenneth The covered garden. Museum Press, Woods, May and Warren, Arete Swartz Glasshouses: a history of greenhouses, orangeries and. Glasshouse book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. When Robin wakes up in a clinic with most of his memories missing, it d /5().

    In the context of the novel, "glasshouse" refers to a military prison. The polity in which the bulk of the story takes place was formerly a high-security facility for war criminals. The term was first used to describe the glass-roofed military detention barracks based in Aldershot, UK, in the midth : Charles Stross. Glasshouses are, of course, all about light. Loudon enthused about the ‘immense teguments of glass’ in his winter gardens, and Hartley’s glasshouses maximised the amount of incident light entering the house by using slender aluminium spars rather than the chunky timber rafters of .

    Horticultural glasshouses are often cited as evidence of how technical refinements took place in nineteenth-century architecture through the use of modular construction and the expressive use of glass and iron. 3 Further, they are frequently regarded as a locus for environmental concerns owing to the specific challenges of keeping tropical. In the early part of the nineteenth century, conservatories along with the glasshouses and orangeries which had been the exclusive plaything of the aristocracy, made their way .


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Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century by Stefan Koppelkamm Download PDF EPUB FB2

Glasshouses and Wintergardens of the 19th Century Paperback – by Stefan Koppelkamm (Author)5/5(1). Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century Hardcover – by Stefan Koppelkamm (Author)Cited by: 1.

Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.3/5(1). Glasshouses and Wintergardens of the 19th Century book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers.3/5(1).

A of 'Glasshouses and Winter Gardens of the Nineteenth Century' by Koppelkamm, Stefan, Published by Granada in in Excellent condition. A well priced book from some of our specialist Glasshouses, Wintergardens, Nineteenth Century topics.

Glasshouses and Wintergardens of the 19th Century by Stefan Koppelkamm (, Paperback) Be the first to write a review About this product Pre-owned: lowest price.

Click to read more about Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century by Stefan Koppelkamm. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for bookloversAuthor: Stefan Koppelkamm. Glasshouses and Winter Gardens of the Nineteenth Century: Books - In 18 libraries.

Ornamental greenhouses. Architectural features.; Architecture, Modern - 19th century.; Conservatories. The first half of this book is an essay tracing the origins and evolution of glasshouses and wintergardens, primarily focusing on the nineteenth century. The second half of the book contains images and descriptions of nineteenth century glasshouses and wintergardens in Europe.

Glassmaking started out modestly with small glasshouses in Pittsburgh and up the Monongahela River in New Geneva during the final few years of the 18th century.

By the close of the 19th century, the Pittsburgh region was producing more than half of all domestic window glass and the lion's share of most other forms of glass in the United States. Winter Gardens Glasshouses and Indoor Plant Collections – Garden Visits.

These indoor winter gardens were largely instigated in the nineteenth century, by those plant collectors par excellence who flourished, particularly, but not exclusively, in Britain. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Koppelkamm, Stefan.

Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century. London ; New York: Granada, COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Koppelkamm, Stefan. Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century.

New York: Rizzoli, Glasshouses Mill was built aroundfirst for producing cotton, and later flax. The mill was run by the Metcalfe family from onwards, and was a prosperous business that employed around people. The Metcalfes were said to be model employers and benefactors, and ran Glasshouses Mill until the end of the 19th century.

Large conservatories, otherwise known as winter gardens, were attached to the side of houses. These buildings gave you and your guests a place to exercise during the cold seasons and bad weather. Glasshouses were heated using simple stoves, during the early Victorian era, fueled by coal or Coke.

Now a firm part of British culture, over the last few centuries, the great English Victorian Glasshouse has become an iconic feature in botanic gardens throughout the country. Often thought of as a cornerstone of gardening itself, the history of the English glasshouse takes its. Stefan Koppelkamm, author of Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century, on LibraryThing.

Stefan Koppelkamm, author of Glasshouses and wintergardens of the nineteenth century, on LibraryThing. LibraryThing is a cataloging and social networking site for booklovers.

Home Groups Talk Zeitgeist. Glass houses of all kinds became popular in the midth century as improvements in technology led to cheaper glass and cast iron and enabled larger sheets of glass to be produced.

Paxton's Crystal Palace, constructed for the Great Exhibition, provided a dramatic advertisement for glazed structures and was a major influence on the.

While in the 19th century many of these conservatories were made out of iron and curvilinear glass. Winter gardens were not just restricted to private residence, many were built for the greater public.

The first large public winter garden was built in –46 in Regent's Park in. He was one of the 19th century thinkers behind Agricultural Improvement and his writing was influential in early Victorian horticulture and landscaping. Glasshouses are, of course, all about light.

Loudon enthused about the “immense teguments of glass” in his winter gardens, and Pearce, Pendreigh and Johnson set out to maximise the amount.Glasshouses for all.

19th-century mechanisation meant that for the first time, glasshouses were within reach of the middle class and by the midth century their distribution was widespread. At Sunnycroft in Shropshire, home to the lawyer John Lander and his family, there is a surviving Edwardian conservatory.